# Book Review # Rewind by Catherine Ryan Howard

The Book Blurb:

From the bestselling, multiple prize-shortlisted novelist Catherine Ryan Howard comes an explosive story about a twisted voyeur and a terrible crime…

PLAY
Andrew, the manager of Shanamore Holiday Cottages, watches his only guest via a hidden camera in her room. One night the unthinkable happens: a shadowy figure emerges onscreen, kills her and destroys the camera. But who is the murderer? How did they know about the camera? And how will Andrew live with himself?

PAUSE
Natalie wishes she’d stayed at home as soon as she arrives in the wintry isolation of Shanamore. There’s something creepy about the manager. She wants to leave, but she can’t – not until she’s found what she’s looking for…

REWIND
This is an explosive story about a murder caught on camera. You’ve already missed the start. To get the full picture you must rewind the tape and play it through to the end, no matter how shocking…

‘Catherine Ryan Howard is a gift to crime writing. Her characters are credible, her stories are original and her plotting is ingenious. Every book is a treat to look forward to.’ Liz Nugent

My thoughts:

Natalie O’Connor-Kerr, a lifestyle blogger and a rising Instagram star, a woman with a dream job, a dream house in an expensive area of Dublin, and a dream husband, takes a bus to the middle of nowhere, a half-deserted village of Shanamore on the coast of Ireland. She has a reservation for one of the strange-looking cottages, supervised by a young man Andrew, who immediately gives her if not creeps, at least a strange vibe. Once in her cottage, Natalie starts looking through the drawers until she finds a poetry book with a blue cover and an expensive bookplate. You see, inside the book there is a dedication ‘For my M’ in Natalie’s handwriting. This is the book she gave her husband on their honeymoon in Rome. Natalie has never been to Shanamore and her husband Mike denies ever setting his foot in the place. So how would you explain the book being there? And how would you explain an entry on Mike’s credit card bill that corresponds to a receipt Natalie somebody put in their mail box? The receipt that was printed out in Shanamore Cottages.

If you read the blurb, you know what follows. A woman is brutally attacked in one of the cottages and stabbed to death. This gruesome scene is captured on video by one of the cameras instaled all over the cottage. As the manager watches in horror at what is happening, the killer, wearing a balaclava and black clothes, calmly walks towards the bedstand and switches off the camera. Who could have known Andrew’s little dirty secret and what is going to happen next?

It is quite difficult to discuss the plot without giving major spoilers. The way the story is narrated is quite original. There are several points of view (at least five, by my count), but the characters are very distinct and get more and more fleshed out as the story progresses. The narrattive is not linear, so we also get flashbacks/rewinds that explain the events and show us why the character ended up leading their life the way they do or why they made this or that particular choice. We also get pause scenes and fast forwards that show the consequences of their actions. All this might sound confusing, but Catherine Ryan Howard’s writing skill makes the story hold together in an effortless way.

I was totally fascinated by the characters, both primary and secondary, the victim, the investigators and the villains, every single one of them has their unique voice and is well-developed. Some of them you will like or at least understand/relate to, while the others are really creepy, and no amount of background could make me understand their mentality and their propensities. I loved the way the author painted the life in this remote village with a few masterful strokes- a friendly waitress, with her collage of Instagram photos, a corner shop with old-fashioned plastic phones and eery silence as soon as a stranger comes in, the village pub where the owner stubbornly refuses make any changes and serves three dishes only – stew, soup and sandwishes – and only between noon and three o’clock with no exceptions, the tiny Garda station (Police) manned by one man only…

As the narrative is quite complicated, it helps that the setting is limited to Dublin and Shanamore. We get a glimpse into what Irish life is like after the downturn of the economy destroyed many illusions nurtured by the phenomenon of the Celtic Tiger. We see it in the description of Audrey, a graduate struggling to keep her badly-paid job in the Entertainment section of an online paper, a ‘click factory’, and Carla, Natalie’s best friend, who feels left behind and a bit bitter towards the people like Natalie, people who found their social media niche and are cashing on it. It does come at a price, of course. We all know that the price is privacy and personal safety, although Mike and Natalie seem to think that the way she posts is going to allow her to keep their family life separate.

Look, Nat values her privacy, okay? I know that seems like a weird thing for someone in her position to claim, but she does. Everything that goes up online is carefully chosen. Than pink suitcase? That’s not even hers. Not the one she uses, anyway. She points out the things to people that she wants them to see and she keeps everything else for herself. For us. We live a private life, ironically.

If you are like me, you might find yourself thinking about parallels with a few iconic films. Psycho and Memento are just two that spring to my mind. The reason for this is that the writing is smart and full of vivid images, and you have to put all the pieces of the puzzle together to work out the story of the woman on the tape. A clever whodunnit, told in an unusual but compelling way, Rewind will keep you glued to the pages until the end.

Thank you to Edelweiss and Blackstone Publishing for the ARC provided in exchange for an honest opinion.

  • Have you read Rewind or is it on your tbr list? If yes, what did you think of it? Did you find any of the characters likeable/relatable?
  • How do you feel about non-linear narratives?

Join the Conversation

27 Comments

    1. Dear Toni, was hoping to invite you to Guest Post on IT’S ALL ABOUT LOVE ❤️
      Would you happen to have a pocket of time for that or are your scheds pretty tight now? 😊🌼🌟

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Dear Yeka, thank you very much for the invite. The first couple weeks of September are really tough for me, but after that I should get better organised. Could I write to you then? Lots of love 🌻💜🌞

        Liked by 1 person

  1. Fantastic review, I’m glad you enjoyed this so much too (: I’ve never seen the film Psycho but I definitely saw a fair few parallels with the TV series of it. And I did quite like some of the characters. Obviously not the creepy ones who I found pretty unnerving where their POVs were so well written but I quite liked Sean and I really liked Audrey, I think her POV was the one that I found most relatable. I also agree that everything comes together really well; to make all of those threads weave together so well must have taken a lot of thought. It always amazes me how thriller writers can create such complex plots without being too obvious or leaving massive plot holes

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Ooh I didn’t consider that. I’d love another book featuring Audrey, especially considering how things ended for her. Sean could be interesting to see again too, we did get some background established for him after all

        Liked by 1 person

  2. I’d like that! I was thinking about Tana French and her Dublin Murder Squad, how the characters that were secondary ones in one book become primary in the next one. Although here the protagonist was of course Natalie, so it wouldn’t work 😂
    I could really relate to Audrey, so I am a bit reluctant to let her go😁

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ooh I still need to read those sometime. But I do like the sound of that. And I agree, she was a fantastic character. I feel like there is a lot of potential for more from her in the future.

      Liked by 1 person

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